was successfully added to your cart.

honda crf250l Archives - Giant Loop

Giant Loop Rider: GL Designer Explores Oregon Backcountry Discovery Route

By | Honda, Riders, Suzuki, Yamaha | No Comments

Giant Loop’s design director, Brian Frankle, recently joined up with a couple of local friends from Bend for an Oregon Backcountry Discovery Route adventure on his Suzuki DRZ400. Here are some of his pics and comments:

“Took a short 4 day trip on the moto on the Oregon Backcountry Discovery Route. Rendezvoused with a few others on day 2 in Ukiah, Oregon. Other than great company, seeing a Bighorn Sheep along the South Fork of the John Day River was a highlight.”


As a long-distance runner and through-hiker (just finish 5th in Pine to Palm 100, he’s hiked the Pacific Crest Trail, etc.) Brian’s an ultralight packer. On this trip he’s living the life of luxury with the Great Basin Saddlebag and Pannier Pockets on his DRZ400.

“Bridge Creek Wildlife Area outside of Ukiah, Oregon. Wildlife Count: 3 cows.”


Our friend and customer Patrick used the Coyote Saddlebag and Fandango Pro Tank Bag on his Honda CRF250L.

“PK at Olive Lake Umatilla National Forest. Olive Lake is a reservoir that provided water and turned the generators at Fremont Power House…which in turn, supplied power to the largest Dredge used for gold mining in North America which sits in Sumpter, Oregon.”


Oregon had it’s own version of the Gold Rush.

“The Dredge in Sumpter, Oregon.”


GL friend and customer Dave packed the Coyote Saddleabg and Fandango Pro Tank Bag on his Yamaha WR250.

“Lunch stop, throttle cable repair, and opening day for Bow Season. Lots of hunters out and about. Malheur National Forest.”


Brian definitely applies our philosophy of “go light, go fast, go far” to his camping gear.

“Find sticks, make shelter. Ochoco National Forest.”


Giant Loop Riders: Alex & Heather from Konflict Motorsports

By | Honda, KTM, Riders, Uncategorized | No Comments

konflict motorsports alex martens and heather martensOne of the things we love our work at Giant Loop is the many friendships we’ve developed with colleagues, people like suspension master Alex Martens from Konflict Motorsports (and The Heavyweights racing team) and his lovely wife Heather. The Martens rolled through town while enjoying a summer adventure and stopped by the shop today, Heather riding a Honda CRF250L and Alex on a KTM 950 Super Enduro. We’re proud the Martens travel with Giant Loop’s Coyote Saddlebag and Diablo Pro Tank Bag on the Honda, and the Great Basin Saddlebag, Tillamook Dry Bag and Fandango Pro Tank Bag on the KTM.

They’re using the Pro model tank bags’ integrated electronics pass-through to keep their cell phones charged.

Diablo Pro Tank Bag on Honda CRF250LCheck out the alternative mounting strap attachment Alex made, since he’s removed the passenger peg mounts from his KTM.

KTM 950 w alternative Great Basin strap attachment

This Slavens Racing Mule Cool brake caliper cooler on the KTM 950 SE is a pretty trick way to keep Alex from boiling his brake fluid (he likes to ride FAST).

Slavens Racing Mule Cool Brake Caliper Cooler


Safe travels friends! See you on the trail!

Konflict Motorsports owner Alex Martens and wife Heather


Giant Loop Review: Thumperbay.com Wheelies Into Camp With Mojavi Saddlebag

By | Honda, Reviews | No Comments

The riders over at Thumperbay.com went camping on a Honda CRF250L, with the Mojavi Saddlebag and wrote a great review on their blog.

A Quote from the review
” …I spent some time in the garage getting the saddlebags fitted to the bike. They come with lots of extra webbing, to accomodate a wide variety of bikes I suppose, but for my purposes they present a lot of unessesary bulk and complication. After some some quick modifications, I came up with what I think is a clean, easy method to get them on and off the bike.

I am impressed with the build quality of the saddlebags, Giant Loop says they are manufactured with a kind of ‘truckers tarp’ that is extremly strong and durable. They seem well made to me.

After that it was time to experiment with what all could be fit inside them. One thing that was immediately apparent was just how suprisingly small they are. I guess this is both a blessing and a curse.”