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Category Archives: Uncategorized

Giant Loop Rider: Black Tie 2 Black Top – Danell Lynn’s “1 Woman, 1 Bike, 1 Year, 50 US States + Canada”

By | Riders, Uncategorized | No Comments

Black Tie 2 Black Top rider Danell Lynn's "1 Woman, 1 Bike, 1 Year, 50 US States + Canada"Danell Lynn stopped over in Bend for the night on her solo motorcycle tour.


Her Triumph Bonneville is kitted out with Giant Loop’s Siskiyou Panniers, Fandango Pro Tank Bag, Tillamook Dry Bag, Rogue Dry Bag and Zigzag Handlebar Bag. She’s attempting a Guinness World Record for most miles ridden in a single country!

Follow her travels on Black Tie 2 Black Top.

Giant Loop Review: Cycle World’s Yamaha WR250R Dual Sport Build

By | Reviews, Uncategorized, Yamaha | No Comments

Thanks to Cycle World for selecting Giant Loop’s Coyote Saddlebag and Diablo Pro Tank Bag for their Yamaha WR250R dual sport project build!

“A 250 is not everyone’s idea of an adventure bike, but the simplicity, lightness, and agility of a small bike will get you to more places with less work than any of the big guns. You must commit to the 60–65-mph cruise and “lack” of luxury. What you get back is going places no GS dares to tread. The $6,690 Yamaha WR250R is a great platform, with a capa­ble chassis and lots of snap from its revvy motor. But it needs mods for high-performance distance travel. Our goal was to build a bike that could, for example, be ridden from LA to Moab and then stripped and re-geared at a campsite for real enduro-style exploring. Total cost for all mods is high, but this is meant as a guide to show benefits of each change so readers can make their own decision on what’s important to them.”

The best hard-core saddlebag and tank bag solution we’ve found is from Giant Loop. Coyote 39-liter saddlebags (giantloopmoto.com, $360) attach securely without using heavy metal racks and come with a heat shield to protect from exhaust heat (we added a second). Capacity is huge and three waterproof liner bags are included. Diablo Pro tank bag adds 4 liters up front ($210) and has a clear map pocket with a power cord inlet for devices. Zippered base has a fuel-cap cutout, meaning the bag can flip out of the way for easy refueling.”

For whole story, visit Cycle World Magazine – and remember to renew your subscription!

Tech Tip: 1-Gallon Reda Gas Can in Coyote Saddlebag

By | Honda, Tech Tips, Uncategorized | No Comments

Take the insult out of “you’ve got gas!” Carry up to 2 GALLONS of extra fuel on your bike by inserting a 1-gallon Reda Innovations Gas Can into each of the lower “legs” of Giant Loop’s Coyote Saddlebag (works great in the Great Basin Saddlebag, too)!

1-gal Reda Gas Can fits Coyote Saddlebag

The Reda Gas Can’s angled shape fits perfectly into the bottom of the lower “legs” on the Coyote Saddlebag.

After filling the Reda can, wipe any spillage off the outside and use a heavy plastic bag to help contain the gas odor.

Plastic bag contains gasoline smell when packing Reda can inside Coyote Saddlebag

Plastic bag contains gasoline smell when packing Reda can inside Coyote Saddlebag.

Simply slide the can into the Coyote Saddlebag, remembering to fold the storm flap over to give you easy sliding access to the zipper.

Plenty of room to spare, even with a gallon of gas in each side of the Coyote Saddlebag.

Plenty of room to spare, even with a gallon of gas in each side of the Coyote Saddlebag.

Zip it, grip it and rip it! You’ve got gas!

Keep your extra fuel weight, low, tight and balanced with the Reda can inside the Coyote Saddlebag

Keep your extra fuel weight, low, tight and balanced with the Reda can inside the Coyote Saddlebag.

Tech Tip: Siskiyou Panniers on KTM 1190 Adventure R – Rackless Mount

By | FAQ, KTM, Tech Tips, Uncategorized | No Comments

Siskiyou Panniers on KTM 1190 and BMW F800I just chased Brad Tawzer, the owner of this bike, through sand whoops, rocky washes and tight twisty rocky jeep trails, and I’m absolutely blown away by how stable and solid the Siskiyou Panniers ride on the KTM 1190 Adventure R. NO RACK REQUIRED! Let’s take a look at his tight and tidy install:

KTM 1190 Adventure w Siskiyou Panniers - rearview

STEP 1: Remove passenger handles and insert spacers to secure tail rack. Tawzer cut his spacers from lengths of steel pipe, but many hardware stores will have an assortment of ready-made spacers, too.

By removing the large passenger grab handles on the KTM 1190 Adventure R and installing spacers in their place to secure the tail rack, the Siskiyou Panniers sit in the optimal postition – panniers lids level with the top of the seat, not drooping over the sides. The cross-over section on the Siskiyou Panniers is adjusted to its minimum width.

Tillamook Dry Bag, Siskiyou Panniers on KTM 1190

STEP 2: Mount Siskiyou Panniers per the provided instructions, securing side anchor straps to passenger footrest mounts and the tail of the panniers to the stock rack. We like to use 16″ Pronghorn Straps to make mounting easier and faster.

The Siskiyou Panniers mount in the usual way, per GL’s instructions included with the Panniers: The two side anchor straps secure to the passenger footrest mounts, and two anchor straps attach the D-rings on  tail of the Panniers to the stock tail rack. We like to use 16″ Pronghorn Straps as our anchors, as they are quick, easy and super secure. Now, here’s the best part  . . .

Siskiyou Panniers' daisy chain attached to KTM 1190's stock luggage mount

STEP 3: Using 16″ Pronghorn Straps, secure Siskiyou Panniers’ wheel-side daisy chains to the stock KTM luggage mounts on both sides.

By securing the Siskiyou Panniers’ wheel-side daisy chains to the stock KTM luggage mounts and drawing forward tension with the side anchor straps, the Panniers become solidly locked into position. Supported by the stock luggage mounts in multiple locations.

KTM stock luggage mounts support Siskiyou Panniers

KTM’s stock luggage mounts support the Siskiyou Panniers in multiple locations, making the installation dead-solid stable on the bike.

If you’re a belt-and-suspenders rider, then add another connection between the wheel-side daisy chain and the super-burly exhaust hanger.

With the stock KTM exhaust, we recommend installing at least one of the included Hot Springs Heat Shields on the top of the exhaust to prevent the Siskiyou Panniers from making direct connect with the hot pipe.

With the stock KTM exhaust, we recommend installing at least one of the included Hot Springs Heat Shields on the top of the exhaust to prevent the Siskiyou Panniers from making direct connect with the hot pipe.

With the stock KTM exhaust, we recommend installing at least one of the included Hot Springs Heat Shields on the top of the exhaust to prevent the Siskiyou Panniers from making direct connect with the hot pipe. Here on Tawzer’s bike, the aftermarket Wings exhaust runs cool enough that heat never becomes an issue, even without the Heat Shield.

Giant Loop Rider: Swamp’s Continental Divide Tour on BMW G650 X-Challenge

By | BMW, Riders, Uncategorized | No Comments
Continental Divide Trail on BMW G650GS X-Challenge


Swamp is a serious adventurer who’s ridden all over the Americas on dual sport bikes. Here’s the intro his latest “Mexico to Canada: Solo on the Continental Divide” with the Coyote Saddlebag, Zigzag Handlebar Bag and Pronghorn Straps:

“After having one of my motorcycles confiscated by a band of illiterate, Ecuadorian customs officials in early July 2014. I returned home and started piddling around with my 2007 BMW G650 X Challenge. Changing the oil, oil filter, air filter; installing new tires and some other modifications and tweaks. The bike had previously received no love from me. I just rode it, never washed it, rarely changed the oil, never changed the filters. Every time I rode it I would try to rag the motor out. It never complained. Never boiled over. Never leaked. Anything.

Swamp keeping it the

Swamp keeping it the “Go Light, Go Fast, Go Far” way, solo on the Continental Divide Trail

I usually like white bikes but the paint on THIS one (yes, its paint not just white plastics) always bothered me so I sanded the plastics down and put a few coats of green paint on it. The bike seemed to say “Jeez, finally!” I let it set for a few weeks. Only riding it down to the river a few times to go fishing.

On July 20th I woke up, made coffee and walked outside. It was foggy; pretty thick. “Ya, I think I’m going to ride the Continental Divide”.

Coyote Saddlebag on BMW G650

New Mexico mud

Five days later, July 25th both the X-Challenge and I were riding through the border town of El Paso Texas then working our way into New Mexico where we would meet up with the Continental Divide trail near Hurley/ Silver City. As far as planning and preparations went, well; I “prepared” for maybe two hours. I had some containers for extra gasoline, one pair of socks, one pair of underwear (wearing both ), a rain jacket, batteries, flash light, small air compressor, some tools, a knife, a lighter, harmonica, protein bars, a trash bag and a camping rig the size of a football. Basically the same shit I’ve carried with me for eight or nine years now.”

BMW G650 X-Challenge on solo Continental Divide Trail

El Vado Reservoir

Lost on the Continental Divide Trail


Here’s Swamp’s comments about the Giant Loop gear in the conclusion of his ride report:

“Giant Loop Coyote bag (giantloopmoto.com) : I’ve had this bag for a few years now and its still holding up despite having the hell beat out of it. The Giant Loop guys have treated me well and have always answered the phone and returned my calls and e-mails. Their customer service is excellent and I believe that their products are excellent. The bag is just that, a bag. Put whatever you can fit in it, its not complicated. On this ride I lashed an extra 1/2 gallon of gas to the top of the bag with no problems using a set of pronghorn straps. The Coyote is the perfect size for this ride.. however I found it strange that I rode The American Flesh Eater Route from California to Alabama (1 month ride) using the smallest giant loop bag (the mojavi) but used a larger bag for this ride.”

“Also, the Pronghorn Straps are friggin’ sweet! Probably my favorite “new thingys” for the bike lately.”


Coyote Saddlebag on BMW G650 - Continental Divide Trail

End of the Trail



Giant Loop Riders: Alex & Heather from Konflict Motorsports

By | Honda, KTM, Riders, Uncategorized | No Comments

konflict motorsports alex martens and heather martensOne of the things we love our work at Giant Loop is the many friendships we’ve developed with colleagues, people like suspension master Alex Martens from Konflict Motorsports (and The Heavyweights racing team) and his lovely wife Heather. The Martens rolled through town while enjoying a summer adventure and stopped by the shop today, Heather riding a Honda CRF250L and Alex on a KTM 950 Super Enduro. We’re proud the Martens travel with Giant Loop’s Coyote Saddlebag and Diablo Pro Tank Bag on the Honda, and the Great Basin Saddlebag, Tillamook Dry Bag and Fandango Pro Tank Bag on the KTM.

They’re using the Pro model tank bags’ integrated electronics pass-through to keep their cell phones charged.

Diablo Pro Tank Bag on Honda CRF250LCheck out the alternative mounting strap attachment Alex made, since he’s removed the passenger peg mounts from his KTM.

KTM 950 w alternative Great Basin strap attachment

This Slavens Racing Mule Cool brake caliper cooler on the KTM 950 SE is a pretty trick way to keep Alex from boiling his brake fluid (he likes to ride FAST).

Slavens Racing Mule Cool Brake Caliper Cooler


Safe travels friends! See you on the trail!

Konflict Motorsports owner Alex Martens and wife Heather


Giant Loop Event: Touratech Rally Served Up Last Weekend’s Adventures

By | Events, Uncategorized | No Comments

This years Touratech Rally had the added element of an Overland section, so the attendance was rumored to hit 1000! There were many rides on the schedule, including a Dirty Girls training session from Tracy Jeffries.

Eric Wright, from 405Motosales, and I-90 Motorsports were headlining the Giant Loop display. Eric showed Bell and Giant Loop, while our friends at I-90 Motorsports handled the retail transactions.






Giant Loop Gear: Placer County Search and Rescue Motorcycle Team @ Hangtown Races 2014

By | Giant Loop Gear, Uncategorized | No Comments

We sent a handful of Medic Mojavi Saddlebags, down to the folks at Placer County Search and Rescue, for their support of Hangtown MX.  One of the guys posted a great pic of the Medic Mojavi equipped bikes on our FaceBook page.  Another medic posted her experience, “These packs were amazing today. Lots of positive feedback from our team & the public too. They look so great!”.  Thanks for the pic and kind words!




Giant Loop Review: Dirt Bike Magazine Writes Up The Buckin’ Roll Tank Bag.

By | Reviews, Uncategorized | No Comments


Dirt Bike magazine’s June issue (dirtbikemagazine.com) sums up the Buckin’ Roll Tank Bag: “BOTTOM LINE: If you’re one of those riders that has issues with a conventional tank or tail bag, the Giant Loop Buckin’ Roll system may be the hot ticket. It’s the least intrusive bag going today. It would make a nice addition to a tail bag or backpack, and while the $235 price tag gets your attention, the ability to cover some ground on your machine and carry enough goods to survive without killing the handling of the machine makes the Giant Loop Buckin’ Roll a focused and positive adventure/dual-sport product.”



Giant Loop Review: We Mounted A Trail Tech Voyager And Captured Our Tracks

By | Reviews, Uncategorized | No Comments

Our friends at Trailtech have equipped our bikes with a Voyager, the trail rider’s GPS, for our up and coming Summer Lake ride. I have ridden with my old Trailtech computer on my bike since I got my first KTM, an ’01 400 EXC. Back then, there was only one Trailtech computer, the Endurance, which I put on that bike to keep track of my hours, mileage and speed.  When I sold the EXC, I kept the Trailtech and mounted it on my KTM 950 for a lighter and smaller speedo/odo that I was familiar with. Wouldn’t you know it, after years of service, the screen just faded away and the light didn’t come on anymore when the bike rolled.  Normally, its never this simple, but I just had to throw another battery in and it was back in action!
Always been happy with my Trailtech, but I have been behind the times…
Trailtech has improved their computers over the years and now offer several models, including the GPS enabled Voyager. I had seen the Voyager at events and on other riders’ bikes, but had no first hand experience, so I was excited to get my hands on one and start capturing tracks!  The package was complete with several pieces of hardware for mounting to 7/8′ and 1-1/8″ handle bars, several electrical cables for sensors and power, instructions for mounting all the cables, a miniSD chip to USB adapter and a CD with “Ride Leader”, Trailtech’s GPS mapping software for GPX files.

My plan was time limited so I decided to mount the Voyager to our Honda XR650R, attach the power and RPM cables, then go run the baby in GPS mode for Speedo and Tracks.  The first thing to do was find room on the bars, then find convenient power to tap into.

I checked the voltage regulator for wire colors and dug out the headlight plug to compare.  The wires were easy to splice into and I used bullet connectors compatible with the existing wiring to make the junctions.

Once I hooked up power and the RPM sensor was wrapped around the spark plug lead, I was ready to button up the project and get down the trail.
After a few miles of action, I had breadcrumbs on the map screen and the unit was calculating average speed and time traveled. Stoked!
The best part was, all the ride stats were a click away and I could plainly see the route we traveled.
Back at the shop, I exported the ride to the on-board SD chip and plugged it into my computer. Opening Ride Leader and uploading the tracks from the SD chip were straight forward and the next thing I knew, there was our ride route, plotted across the map.
TT tracks 5-14-14
All in all a great experience and I look forward to capturing more tracks and navigating with the Voyager.
I still have a coolant temp and wheel speed sensors on the bench and will install them next time I take the tank off.