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Category Archives: Triumph

GL Rider Danell Lynn featured in Triumph Motorcycles’ Spirit Magazine

By | News, Riders, Triumph | No Comments

“The more people said ‘you can’t’, the more I wanted to say ‘yes I can’.” — Danell Lynn, Black Tie 2 Black Top, Triumph Spirt Magazine

“Danell Lynn is aiming to gatecrash the Guinness World Records book for the longest journey in a single country on a motorcycle. The 30-something is part way through visiting every one of America’s 50 states, Canada and Alaska, on her 2006 Bonneville called Amelia.”

Danell Lynn in Triumph Motorcycles Spirit Magazine

Danell Lynn in Triumph Motorcycles Spirit Magazine

Check out the story at Triumph Spirit!

Giant Loop Rider: Tammy Rides Her First Event, 2014 Alley Sweeper, On Her Vintage Triumph, With Diablo Tank Bag And Mojavi Saddlebag

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The trip to Portland for last weekend’s  Alley Sweeper, was worth a load of adventures. Especially for Tammy, since this was her first (dis)organized ride.

Arriving at the start of the ride was pretty telling, the whole street was filling with rough tire motos, of one sort or another. There were costumed riders, riders on vintage two-stroke enduros, monkey bikes and mopeds, in addition to the pile of modern dual sports and adventure bikes. It was easy for us to get staged with the van, since there weren’t many cars parked in the area. As we finished getting ready, the street filled in with riders and motos, anticipating the announcements and rider’s meeting.






Tammy has only been riding for a couple years and her experience is mainly riding Vintage bikes on dirt. She had been out in the woods riding a couple weekends ago, so she was ready for more. McQueen, her 1971 Triumph T100C Trophy  was kitted with Diablo Tank Bag and Mojavi Saddlebag. What she had limited experience with, was riding in city traffic and she had never ridden pavement in the rain. She was pretty nervous about the wet pavement, until I reminded her to treat it like dirt and expect a little slipping and sliding. She got the hang of wet roads quick, but she still had a sharp concern about getting into and out of car traffic, as we filtered through the streets to reach the next set of alley ways.

The alleys were as diverse as the bikers, paved, gravel, mud, grass and puddles. The alleys were surrounded by yards in every state of trim and disrepair.


Here was one little piece of “city rock” that caused us to pause and double check McQueen’s engine case for oil leaks! Luckily, Tammy rode right through without getting dumped off, when she hit that one.


Occasionally we saw residents, out watching the parade, or trying to instigate some contention with riders. Tam and I came across one such alley, with a few discontents waving a phone camera at us and trying to engage us. We took the high road and turned onto the street, rather that have our enjoyment interrupted with meaningless debate about access to public right-of-ways and the city permitting required to stop us from riding on “their” public road. As we got deeper into the route, there were other creative residents, parking trucks across the alley ways, preventing us from continuing through several of the designated alleys. As we had already found the need to be “flexible” with the routing, we were able to pick up the next alley, without loosing too much track.


Tammy was tired after we had completed the sections of North route, so we decided to wrap up our participation and headed back to base. She was thrilled with excitement from completing the stages we did and she was totally beat from all the concentration and effort needed to handle her Triumph in the alleys and city traffic. The Honda XR650R, kitted with Mojavi Saddlebag, Pannier Pockets and Possibles Pouches, performed predictably for me. It was easy to spy upcoming alleys, while standing in its tall cockpit. Thankfully the Honda was not as coldblooded as usual and fired up second kick, every time. Tammy’s Triumph was easy to start all day, too, but got a bit hot after several long sections of slow muddy alley way, so it got a cool off break half way through the ride.

The guys at Sang Froid Riding Club had done a good job with their map and route plans, but they did a GREAT job on their ride Tshirt. Tammy was very happy to see such a cool Tshirt, as her first ride commemoration and bought me one too. I’ll get a proper pic of the Tshirt(thought I had one) and add it to this post.

Giant Loop Rider: Death Valley Noobs Rally Medical Volunteer Rob Preps MEDIC MoJavi Saddlebag

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We enjoyed this recent message from one of our “Mojavis For Medics” program participants, Rob:

“Hello again, Here is some more info on myself. Fulltime Fire Rescue at Canmore Fire Rescue in Canada (just outside Banff AB in the Mountains). My title here is Lieutenant Operations/Hazmat/Training – as an ALS fire medic in the mountains I do structural fire protection and mountain rescue. I am also casual with Alberta Health Services and do about 6 shifts a month on the ambulance. Here are some of my certifications:

-ACLS instructor/coordinator
-PALS instructor /coordinator
-CPR instructor
-Rope Rescue Technician Instructor(Rescue 3 International)
-Ice Rescue Technician Instructor(Rescue 3 International)
-Swift Water Rescue Technician Instructor(Rescue 3 International)
-Structural Collapse Technician NFPA
-Confined Space Technician NFPA
-ICS 400
-Hazmat Technician NFPA
-CBRNE Technician
-Advanced Hazmat Life Support Provider

I carry a full kit when I ride down in Death Valley for the Death Valley Noobs Rally, every thing from sutures to ETT tubes if intubation is needed, a full bandage kit, c-collar, tourniquet, symptomatic drugs if needed, and I leave an automated external defibrillator in camp. Last year I was down at the Silverton, CO event also while doing the CO Backcountry Discovery Route. At the Death Valley Rally last year we had a few mishaps fractured leg, fractured foot and a dislocated should with fractured clavicle.”

Rob rides a tricked out Triumph Tiger 800, with Giant Loop’s Fandango Tank Bag  – and soon a MEDIC MoJavi Saddlebag. He surely puts his bike through the paces, having ridden three Backcountry Discovery Routes, as well as volunteering at the Death Valley Noobs Rally.  Thanks, Rob, for supporting the rider community by volunteering your skills!

rob evans-davies canmore canada