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Monthly Archives: September 2013

Giant Loop Rider: Kail Visits on Oregon Backcountry Tour with KTM 990 Adventure

By | Fitment, KTM, Riders | No Comments

Really cool to have a visit from Giant Loop rider Kail, who stopped by the shop after five days of exploring the Oregon Backcountry Discovery Route on his KTM 990 Adventure.
Check out his nice tool box fabrication!
And the Buckin’ Roll Tank Bag works great with his Safari Tank and the Fandango Tank Bag!
Kail’s kit is light and tight with the Great Basin Saddlebag and Great Basin Dry Bag completing his Giant Loop expedition packing system.
Kail was one of Giant Loop’s first customers when we started in 2008 with the original bolt-on Giant Loop Saddlebag! From March 2009, here’s a blog post and pic from his adventures in California’s Los Padres National Forest on his KTM 530 EXC.

kail ktm 530 giant loop saddlebag

Giant Loop Gear: Two New Waterproof Double Ended Roll Top Dry Bags, Plus Expedition Fender Straps

By | Giant Loop Gear | No Comments

Rubber Boa Straps detailJust in time for Fall and Winter motorcycle riding, Giant Loop releases two NEW 100% waterproof double ended roll top dry bags, the Tillamook Dry Bag and the Rogue Dry Bag.

Plus, expedition strength shock cord fender straps, the Rubber Boa Straps.

Rogue Dry Bag and Tillamook Dry BagNEW MOTORCYCLE PRODUCT: Tillamook Dry Bag (38 liters) and Rogue Dry Bag (17 liters)
Indispensible equipment for on- and off-road motorcyclists – keeps gear dry and easily accessible.
* Made in USA
* Limited Lifetime Warranty
* 18 oz. polyurethane with welded seams
* Reflective daisy chain – easy attachment, high visibility
* Vertical nylon compression straps with heavy-duty side release buckles

Tillamook Dry Bag top unrolledTillamook Dry Bag™
* 38 liters packable volume
* unpacked flat dimensions 40″ x 19″
* Integrates with Giant Loop’s Siskiyou Panniers
* 2 reflective daisy chains
* MSRP $89.00



Rogue Dry Bag top unrolledRogue Dry Bag™
* 17 liters packable volume
* unpacked flat dimensions 32.5″ x 13.5″
* Integrates with Giant Loop’s Coyote/Great Basin Saddlebags
* 1 reflective daisy chain
* MSRP $73.00


Rubber Boa StrapsPut the squeeze on a spare inner tube, tools, water or other essential gear with Giant Loop’s new Rubber Boa Straps™ lashed to dirt bike fenders.
* Made in the USA
* Military-spec 1/4-in. shock cord
* Heavy-duty injection molded fender hooks
* Super tough and stable
* Fit most standard dirt bike plastics
* MSRP $25 (package of 2)

Support our excellent Giant Loop dealers! Find your nearby Authorized Giant Loop Dealer here.

Go light, go fast, go far,
Team Giant Loop

Designed in Bend, Oregon | Made in USA | Ridden Worldwide

Giant Loop Rider: Overland International Tech Editor’s Fly-And-Buy BMW F650GS Paris-Dakar

By | BMW, Riders | No Comments

Thanks Christophe Noel for the beautiful pics and great feedback. Because Giant Loop packing systems strap onto a broad spectrum of motorcycle makes and models, it’s easy to travel for a fly-and-ride or a fly-and-buy.  Just check your saddlebags as luggage and use tank bags and dry bags as carry-on bags. and Glad the Coyote Saddlebag, Coyote Dry Pods, Rogue Dry Bag and Fandango Tank Bag stood up to the torrents of rain in Colorado last week. Wishing better weather for you down the road!

dakar_desertSo, here’s a testimony for you: I flew into Denver on Wednesday with the gear you sent over. I mounted it to my new-to-me Dakar and rode right into Boulder during the worst flood they’ve had in 500 years. It rained 3 inches during my ride north to Fort Collins just 45 miles away. I averaged about 12 mph with the traffic and road closures. Epic is an overused word, but it applies here. I was stuck in Fort Collins until yesterday. I rode another 5 hours in torrential rain with probably another 2-3 inches falling on me.

All of my goodies are dry as a bone in the Coyote bag with dry bags. And those straps are THE BOMB. Amazing how something so simple can be so fantastic.

dakarAnyway, I found some sunshine today and thought I’d send you some feedback. 500 more miles tomorrow. Great stuff!

Christophe Noel
Technical Editor

Overland International
Direct: 928-273-3754
Overland Journal overlandjournal.com
Expedition Portal expeditionportal.com

3035 N Tarra Ave, Suite 1
Prescott, AZ 86301

Giant Loop Video: Honda XRV750 Africa Twin in Slovenia with Great Basin Saddlebag, Fandango Tank Bag

By | Fitment, Honda, Riders, Video | No Comments

Aim for the Horizon – three UK riders on Honda XRV750 Africa Twins with Great Basin Saddlebags and Fandango Tank Bags – share the latest chapter of their ongoing adventures: riding Slovenia. In the snow, no less! Good thing they embrace the “go light, go fast, go far” approach, with gear positioned closest to the Aftrica Twin’s center, both fore/aft and side/side. We’re inspired to Aim for the Horizon!

Giant Loop Video: Canadian Couple Touring on Suzuki DR200 with Coyote Saddlebag

By | Fitment, Riders, Suzuki, Video | No Comments

Nice video from a couple of Giant Loop riders from British Columbia! “Just a short proof of concept trip on the little Suzuki bikes before tackling something adventurous,” as they describe it. We love camping with small motorcycles – this is our origin and roots as a company – so we love to see others discovering the joys of the “go light, go fast, go far” approach to packing a small displacement dual sport motorcycle.

Giant Loop Review: ADV Moto Magazine Tests Diablo Tank Bag on Kawasaki KLX250 Adventure Build

By | Fitment, Kawasaki, Reviews | No Comments

Giant Loop’s Diablo Tank Bag featured in ADV Moto magazine, September/October 2013, Kawasaki KLX250 Project Bike

Thanks ADV Moto for including Giant Loop’s Diablo Tank Bag in the September/October issue’s “ADV Ride For The Masses”! The Diablo Tank Bag is nicely proportioned for smaller enduro and dual sport motorcycles, and it looks great on the Kawasaki KLX250.


Kawasaki’s affordable, dependable KLX250 makes a great dual sport and adventure touring machine, especially for a rider who’s new to on- and/or off-road motorcycling.

ADV Moto magazine Diablo Tank Bag in Kawasaki KLX250 adventure project bike

Great example of the Diablo/Fandango Harness with fuel access on Kawasaki KLX250

“For extended trips on small bikes, soft luggage makes a lot of sense, and there are a few options worth exploring  . . . We installed a Giant Loop Diablo tank bag, which looks like it was made just for the KLX. The removable base exposes the No-Toil billet venting gas cap perfectly, and the bag itself is waterproof [note: we describe our bags as Adventure Proof – super rugged, stable and highly water resistant, not waterproof] — large enough to hold your keys, wallet, phone, snacks and some water. Upgrading to the Fandango , for more room [note: same price], is easy and uses the same base!”ADV Moto

We describe our tank bags as “Adventure Proof” – super rugged, stable (GL’s top design priorities) and highly water resistant. Not waterproof.

Because our bags are designed first and foremost to be Adventure Proof, a ziplock bag or protective case inside is all it takes to keep moisture sensitive gear dry.

We think the term “waterproof” is used VERY loosely in the motorcycle industry. We believe accuracy is key to setting appropriate customer expectations. We’d rather “under promise and over deliver” when it comes to claims about preventing water from penetrating our saddlebags and tank bags.

We use the term Water Proof to describe our seam sealed and/or welded roll-top bags only.

Also, our experience suggests that carrying weight behind the rear axel and above seat height (i.e., in a top case) has the greatest impact on the handling of the motorcycle. Especially off-road. Especially for an inexperienced rider on a lightweight dual sport bike. Learning to ride off-road is a lot more fun if the bike feels balanced and solid beneath the rider, not top-heavy and light in the front.

Positioning weight close to the motorcycle’s center (both fore/aft and side/side) and below seat height reduces the impact of gear weight on the bike’s handling, both on- and off-road. And we believe this maximizes the riding experience, making it both safer and more enjoyable.

Keep up the great work, ADV Moto – the magazine just keeps getting better with each issue!

Giant Loop Tech Tip: Cycle World Magazine’s First Aid Kit Packing List & Preparations

By | Blog, Tech Tips | No Comments

Cycle World magazine, August 2013

With the Giant Loop’s “Mojavis for Medics” program in full swing, our interest in first aid essentials has broadened — as has our awareness of how poorly prepared and trained many of us are to repsond appropriately to fellow riders (or ourselves) in need of first aid. In the August issue of Cycle World magazine, this excellent article by editor-in-chief Mark Hoyer caught our attention. Hoyer details his experience with injuries he has witnessed during his rides and offers suggestions, based on his experience as a volunteer firefighter/EMT, for what to include in a motorcyclist’s first aid kit:

“The essentials: 1. Four size-Large non-latex gloves; 2. Blunt-nose scissors to cut clothing/bandages (get the best you can afford — they need to work); 3. Tweezers; 4. Sterile gauze pads (4×4 in.); 5. Roller bandage (3-in.-wide elastic/4-in.-wide stretchy gauze); 6. Antiseptic wipe/packets Neosporin; 7. Adhesive cloth or plastic tape; 8. Adhesive bandages (assorted sizes); 9. Surgical/compress dressing (big, absorbant, cuttable); 10. Tongue depressors (finger splints!); 11. CPR barrier (look for an Ambu Res-Cue Key CPR Mask); Tourniquet.”

And even more important than supplies:
“So, no matter where you ride, be prepared for medical emergencies. The three most important tools weigh nothing and take no luggage space: fitness, situational awareness and training. . . . Basic first-aid/CPR training should be your minimum standard, but EMT certification is even better.”

Kudos to Cycle World and Hoyer – we’re inspired to add first aid supplies, fitness, situational awareness and training to our adventure kit!


“Long-Ride Essentials – The Medical Question,” by Cycle World magazine’s editor-in-chief Mark Hoyer, August 2013